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Category: Fashion

06/12/08


Categories: Fashion

Vintage: trash or treasure?

Vintage fashion: collecting and wearing designer classics

What comes to mind when you hear the word vintage? Is it smelly old clothes from a tucked in the basement consignment shop or is it something fabulous? Something straight off of Audrey Hepburn and into your closet? Something beautiful and unique from a specialty store? An age old design given new life in the 21st century?

Vintage fashion showcases the history of vintage fashion starting in the '20s and covering everything till the '80s. It also includes some history and origins of designers as well as different textiles used at the time. The stunning illustrations and descriptive text make this a must have for the fashionista. It was a bit disappointing that it did not also cover men's vintage fashion, which I think is an area often left out of the fashion picture.

Overall it fed and satisfied the part of me that secretly desires a vintage wardrobe!

--The Library Technician


04/08/08


Love, Afghan Style

Rodriguez, Deborah, with Kristin Ohlson: Kabul Beauty School: An American Woman Behind the Veil

Deborah Rodriguez arrived in Afghanistan shortly after the fall of the Taliban in 2001, as part of a group offering humanitarian aid. She stood out among the volunteers, who were primarily medical personnel, because her area of specialization was as a beautician and salon owner. Her well-meaning but brazen personality was both a help and a hindrance as she began to learn about the cultural and social mores of this complex and war-torn nation.

The Kabul Beauty School she established offered women a chance to support themselves, and often their households, as well as an opportunity to help others feel positive about their appearance.

As Rodriguez teaches, so she learns - hearing the stories of the challenges the women face with their husbands and families gives her the courage to leave her own unhealthy marriage and to experience love again, Afghan style.



Love, Afghan Style

Rodriguez, Deborah, with Kristin Ohlson: Kabul Beauty School: An American Woman Behind the Veil

Deborah Rodriguez arrived in Afghanistan shortly after the fall of the Taliban in 2001, as part of a group offering humanitarian aid. She stood out among the volunteers, who were primarily medical personnel, because her area of specialization was as a beautician and salon owner. Her well-meaning but brazen personality was both a help and a hindrance as she began to learn about the cultural and social mores of this complex and war-torn nation.

The Kabul Beauty School she established offered women a chance to support themselves, and often their households, as well as an opportunity to help others feel positive about their appearance.

As Rodriguez teaches, so she learns - hearing the stories of the challenges the women face with their husbands and families gives her the courage to leave her own unhealthy marriage and to experience love again, Afghan style.


03/18/08


The Art of Aging Gracefully

Kreamer, Anne: Going Gray: What I learned about beauty, sex, work, motherhood, and everything else that really matters

Anne Kreamer, happily married mother of two, and successful New York career woman, has a revelation when she sees a photo of herself, aged 49, posed with her teenage daughter. While she had always prided herself on her youthful appearance, the picture demonstrated that her hair colouring was harsh and unnatural, and did not in fact, make her look as young as she felt.

Kreamer develops a plan to go gradually gray, and along the way she also decides to investigate, through interviews and field experiments, how this will affect how others see her, both in romantic and in job-related terms. The results of her experiment are surprising and illuminating, as she seeks to “age gracefully”.

One concern with the book includes the fact that, while she tries to remain respectful of others’ choices regarding hair colouring, she does veer into preachiness at times. Another issue is that she cannot really be considered representative of the majority of women in North America, as her life is that of an upper-middle-class cosmopolitan with friendships among those well-known in the media.

Nonetheless, this book is valuable reading for those of us “of a certain age” as we strive, with Anne Kreamer, to achieve “a balance between attractiveness and authenticity”.