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Archives for: 2012

12/19/12


Categories: Adventure

New Non-Fiction includes "The queen of Katwe"

Check out the New Non-Fiction page
(click the Books, Movies, Music tab on the main Regina Public Library page. Then click on New Book Releases to see a selection of the newest books added to the collection.)

From this month's New Non-Fiction selections:

The queen of Katwe : a story of life, chess, and one extraordinary girl's rise from an African slum
by Tim Crothers.
Phiona Mutesi is a 15-year-old girl born and raised in a miserable slum called Katwe in Kampala, Uganda. She sleeps in a decrepit mud hut with her mother and four siblings and struggles to find a single meal each day. Phiona has been in and out of school her whole life because her mother cannot afford to send her, so she is only now learning to read and write. Phiona Mutesi is also one of the top chess players in the world.

One day in 2005, while desperately searching for food, Phiona followed her brother to a mission church where she met Robert Katende, another child of the Ugandan slums, who works for an American organization that offers relief and religion through sports. Robert introduced Phiona to the game of chess and within months he discovered her immense talent. ........

To be African is to an underdog in the world. To be Ugandan is to be an underdog in Africa. To be from Katwe is to be an underdog in Uganda. And to be a girl is to be an underdog in Katwe.The Queen of Katweis the ultimate underdog story.

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Use the key words "girls" and "Uganda" for more books on girl's lives in that country.

Use the key words "chess players" and "biography" to find more biographies of chess players.


11/04/12


Double cross : the true story of the D-day spies

Double cross : the true story of the D-day spies by Ben Macintyre

Here's what the Publisher's Weekly review had to say: "Any method of seeking the truth can also be used to plant a lie." Therein lies the root of the brilliantly dangerous Allied plan (which MI5 called Double Cross) - recounted by Macintyre with the same skill and suspense he displayed in Operation Mincemeat and Agent Zigzag - to throw off the Germans and launch an assault at Normandy on June 6, 1944. The key to the plan - convincing Germany that the impending attack would come either at Pas de Calais or in Norway - was the careful manipulation of five double agents, each feeding misinformation back to their German handlers.
Polish zealot Roman Czerniawski volunteered his services to his German captors, only to defect to Britain and become "Agent Brutus." Serbian playboy Dusan Popov ("Agent Tricycle") became one of MI5's most prized assets. Failed Catalan chicken farmer Juan Pujol ("Agent Garbo") badgered both German and British intelligence services into accepting him, eventually becoming the linchpin of the D-Day ploy. Lily Sergeyev ("Agent Treasure"), a high-strung Frenchwoman, had the opportunity to blow the whole operation with a single punctuation mark, while Elvira de la Fuente Chaudoir ("Agent Bronx") transformed from a gambling Peruvian society girl to solid double agent. Macintyre effortlessly weaves the agents' deliciously eccentric personalities with larger wartime events to shape a tale that reads like a top-notch spy thriller.


09/24/12


New Non-Fiction at RPL

Check out the New Non-Fiction page
(click the Books, Movies, Music tab on the main Regina Public Library page. Then click on New Book Releases to see a selection of the newest books added to the collection.)

From the New Non-Fiction selections:

Dearie: The Remarkable Life of Julia Child
by Bob Spitz

Here's what the Publisher's Weekly review had to say:
On November 3, 1948, a lunch in a Paris restaurant of sole meunière, the sole so very fresh with its delicate texture and cooked like an omelet in nothing but a bath of clarified butter, changed Julia Child's life. In that moment, Child (1912-2004) recognized and embraced food as her calling, setting out initially to learn the finer points of cooking, and French cooking in particular.
In this affectionate and entertaining tribute to the witty, down-to-earth, bumptious, and passionate host of The French Chef, Spitz exhaustively chronicles Child's life and career from her childhood in California through her social butterfly flitting at Smith and her work for a Pasadena department store to her stint in government service, her marriage to Paul Child, and her rise to become America's food darling with the publication of Mastering the Art of French Cooking and her many television shows. In spite of her miserable failures in her early attempts to prepare food for her husband, a determined Child enrolled in courses at the renowned French cooking school, Le Cordon Bleu, where she mastered everything from sauces to souffles. Spitz reminds us that Child had always possessed a tremendous amount of excess energy with no outlet for expressing it. With the publication of her cookbook and the subsequent television shows, she discovered the place where she could use her cooking skills, her force of personality, and her abundant charm. Released to coincide with Child's centenary, Spitz's delightful biography succeeds in being as big as its subject.

Other books about Julia Child (using "Child, Julia" as a subject in the RPL catalogue).


07/31/12


Carly's voice : breaking through autism

Carly's voice : breaking through autism
by Arthur Fleischmann with Carly Fleischmann

Summary: The extraordinary and moving story of Carly Fleischmann, a teenager with severe autism who, through technology and today's social networks, has become a passionate advocate for kids everywhere.

Related link: Globe & Mail article The Swamp of Autism: a challenged marriage and a child without a voice

More books about children with autism (this list was generated by using key words autism children parents and sorting by date)


05/22/12


Wild : from lost to found on the Pacific Crest Trail

Wild : from lost to found on the Pacific Crest Trail by Cheryl Strayed

Summary: A powerful, blazingly honest memoir: the story of an eleven-hundred-mile solo hike that broke down a young woman reeling from catastrophe-and built her back up again. At twenty-two, Cheryl Strayed thought she had lost everything. In the wake of her mother's death, her family scattered and her own marriage was soon destroyed. Four years later, with nothing more to lose, she made the most impulsive decision of her life: to hike the Pacific Crest Trail from the Mojave Desert through California and Oregon to Washington State-and to do it alone. She had no experience as a long-distance hiker, and the trail was little more than "an idea, vague and outlandish and full of promise". But it was a promise of piecing back together a life that had come undone. Strayed faces down rattlesnakes and black bears, intense heat and record snowfalls, and both the beauty and loneliness of the trail. Told with great suspense and style, sparkling with warmth and humor, Wild vividly captures the terrors and pleasures of one young woman forging ahead against all odds on a journey that maddened, strengthened, and ultimately healed her.

Read the New York Times review: The Tracks of an Author's, and a Reader's, Tears: ‘Wild’ by Cheryl Strayed, a Walkabout of Reinvention

Want more like this? Here's a list from the library catalogue using the key words "travel*" and "hiking".


04/29/12


Saskatchewan Book Awards winners 2012

Saskatchewan Book Awards winners were announced on April 28

Here are some of the Non-Fiction Awards. For the full list, go to the link above:

Book of the Year:

* Darren R. Préfontaine: Gabriel Dumont : li chef michif in images and in words
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Non-Fiction Award:

* Curtis R. McManus: Happyland: A History of the "Dirty Thirties" in Saskatchewan, 1914-1937

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* Mark Cronlund Anderson and Carmen L. Robertson won the Scholarly Writing Award, the First Peoples’ Writing Award and the Regina Book Award for their book Seeing Red: A History of Natives in Canadian Newspapers.
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04/23/12


Categories: Home and Garden

Booklist's Top Gardening books

Click here for the full list online on the Booklist website:
Top Ten Craft and Gardening Books.

I've pulled just the gardening books for this blog post.

The brief descriptions/reviews are by the list's author Brad Hooper.

American Eden: From Monticello to Central Park to Our Backyards; What Our Gardens Tell Us about Who We Are. By Wade Graham.

Garden designer and historian Graham presents a fresh, critical, and brilliantly wide-ranging interpretation of the form, function, and meaning of American gardens.
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The Edible Front Yard. By Ivette Soler.

Soler inspires and guides readers in transforming their front yards into beautifully diverse gardens that provide delicious, healthy produce, both tried-and-true and exotic.
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Founding Gardeners: The Revolutionary Generation, Nature, and the Shaping of the American Nation. By Andrea Wulf.

In her uniquely discerning and zestfully anecdotal inquiry, Wulf astutely traces how profoundly the great horticultural passions of the Founding Fathers (Washington, Adams, Jefferson, and Madison) shaped America’s founding principles.
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The Ultimate Guide to Growing Your Own Food: Save Money, Live Better, and Enjoy Life with Food from Your Garden or Orchard. By Monte Burch.

Burch offers exceptionally lucid how-to gardening guidance to encourage readers to grow their own fruits and vegetables to save money, improve their health, protect the environment, and enjoy food like never before.
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The Vegetable Gardener’s Container Bible: How to Grow a Bounty of Food in Pots, Tubs, and Other Containers. By Edward C. Smith.

Best-selling garden guru Smith explains with enthusiasm precisely how to use containers to grow, harvest, and enjoy homegrown vegetables, yard or no yard.

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Look for more gardening books by using "gardening" as a key word and sorting the list by date.

Fine-tune your search by adding key words like vegetable gardening or container gardening or landscape gardening

posted by Sharon


04/04/12


The Cure for Everything! by Timothy Caulfield and other books about health, fitness and happiness

The Cure for Everything! Untangling the Twisted Messages About Health, Fitness, and Happiness
by Timothy Caulfield

Summary: The surprising truth about what it takes to be healthy In The Cure for Everything! health-law expert Timothy Caulfield exposes the special interests that twist good science about health and fitness in order to sell us services and products that mostly don't work. Want great abs? You won't get them by using the latest Ab-Flex-Spinner-Thingy. Are you trying to lose ten pounds? Diet books are a waste of trees. Do you rely on health-care practitioners-either mainstream or alternative-to provide the cure for what ails you? Then beware! Both Big Pharma and naturopathy are powerful forces that have products and services to sell. Caulfield doesn't just talk the talk. He signs up for circuit training with a Hollywood trainer who cultivates the abs of the stars. With his own Food Advisory Team (FAT) made up of specialists in nutrition and diet, Caulfield makes a lifestyle change that really works. (Mainly it involves eating less than he is used to. Much less.) And when he embarks on a holiday cruise, dreading motion sickness, he takes along both a homeopathic and pharmaceutical remedy-with surprising results. This is a lighthearted book with a serious theme. Caulfield demonstrates that the truth about being healthy is easy to find-but often hard to do.

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Here's some of what the National Post review had to say:
By the end of the book, Caulfield gets at the deep irony in the fact that we’ve never had so much scientific knowledge at our fingertips, yet “it is being subjected to an unprecedented number of perverting influences.” This geeky diet tome, then, becomes a compelling and timely argument for science and a reminder that science is an iterative process, breakthroughs are rare, and there are no magical cures for everything.

“Science, when done properly, is worth defending,” he writes. “And it’s worth defending because when it’s not twisted, it actually can make us healthier.”

Read the full National Post review of The Cure for Everything.

Check out what other books comes up with the key words (health happiness nutrition)


03/25/12


The Chimps of Fauna Sanctuary: A Canadian Story of Resilience and Recovery - winner of the Charles Taylor Prize

The Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Nonfiction was awarded to

Andrew Westoll for The Chimps of Fauna Sanctuary: A Canadian Story of Resilience and Recovery

Journalist Andrew Westoll recounts his time spent at the Fauna Sanctuary in rural Quebec as a volunteer caregiver for a family of chimpanzees rescued from a research lab.

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The Short List:

Wade Davis: Into the Silence: The Great War, Mallory and the Conquest of Everest

Charlotte Gill: Eating Dirt: Deep Forests, Big Timber and Life with the Tree-Planting Tribe

JJ Lee: The Measure of a Man: The Story of a Father, a Son, and a Suit


Madeline Sonik: Afflictions & Departures: Essays


02/04/12


2012 Canada Reads

Canada Reads 2012 Contest (click here to go to the CBC Canada Reads website. You can read more about the books and the authors)

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WINNER:

Something Fierce by Carmen Aguirre

Something Fierce is playwright and actor Carmen Aguirre's memoir about coming of age in the Chilean resistance movement.

The Author: Carmen Aguirre grew up amid the terror and defiance of the Chilean resistance movement.

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THE OTHER NOMINEES:

The Game by Ken Dryden

The Game is still widely regarded as the best book about hockey ever written, even almost 30 years after its original publication in 1983. In it, legendary goalie Ken Dryden chronicles his 1979 season with the Montreal Canadiens.

The Author: Ken Dryden was a legendary goalie for the Montreal Canadians. He has written five books and served as a Liberal MP for seven years.



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On a Cold Road by Dave Bidini

On a Cold Road is the book that marked Rheostatics guitarist Dave Bidini's transition from rock star to writer, a chronicle of the band's 1996 cross-Canada tour with The Tragically Hip.

The Author: Dave Bidini used to be a guitarist for the iconic rock band the Rheostatics. He has published 10 books, and writes a regular column in the National Post.


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Prisoner of Tehran by Marina Nemat

Prisoner of Tehran is Marina Nemat's harrowing account of the two years she spent as a teenager in a political prison in Iran after the Islamic Revolution.

The Author: Marina Nemat grew up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution and followed up the success of her first book with a sequel, After Tehran, about her life in Canada.

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The Tiger by John Vaillant

The Tiger is a shocking true story about the struggle between the citizens of a remote Russian village and the ferocious, endangered Siberian tiger who is out for revenge against the poachers who survive by destroying his kind.

The Author: John Vaillant has worked as a journalist since 1998, exploring the often surprising collisions between man and nature.
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02/03/12


Behind the Beautiful Forevers

Publishing insiders suspect that Behind the Beautiful Forevers: : [life, death, and hope in a Mumbai undercity] is going to be the big breakout book of 2012. Here is the description from Random House:

Annawadi is a makeshift settlement in the shadow of luxury hotels near the Mumbai airport, and as India starts to prosper, Annawadians are electric with hope. Abdul, a reflective and enterprising Muslim teenager, sees “a fortune beyond counting” in the recyclable garbage that richer people throw away. Asha, a woman of formidable wit and deep scars from a childhood in rural poverty, has identified an alternate route to the middle class: political corruption. With a little luck, her sensitive, beautiful daughter—Annawadi’s “most-everything girl”—will soon become its first female college graduate. And even the poorest Annawadians, like Kalu, a fifteen-year-old scrap-metal thief, believe themselves inching closer to the good lives and good times they call “the full enjoy.”

But then Abdul the garbage sorter is falsely accused in a shocking tragedy; terror and a global recession rock the city; and suppressed tensions over religion, caste, sex, power and economic envy turn brutal. As the tenderest individual hopes intersect with the greatest global truths, the true contours of a competitive age are revealed. And so, too, are the imaginations and courage of the people of Annawadi.


01/09/12


Categories: Bestsellers, Award Winners

The Globe 100: Non-Fiction

This is a selection from the Globe & Mail's 100 best-reviewed titles of 2011 - Non-Fiction

For the complete list, go to this link - the non-fiction starts about half way down the page.
Excerpts from the Globe & Mail reviews appear below each title.

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The End: The Defiance and Destruction of Hitler’s Germany, 1944-1945 by Ian Kershaw

In this remarkable book, Kershaw (author of a definitive biography of Hitler) tells the story of the mass murder and homicidal suicide of the Third Reich in its final days with a mastery of detail so compelling that I could not put it down. A magnificent account of the “twilight of the Nazi gods.” – Jonathan Steinberg

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Rin Tin Tin: The Life and the Legend by Susan Orlean

Orlean gives us an extraordinary narrative about the careers of the many Rin Tin Tins and the man who “discovered” the canine silent film star. Deeper, larger issues are brought to bear as well: our need for creating permanence; the promise of friendship and how we find completion; our abiding wish to be remembered. – M.A.C. Farrant

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Blue Nights by Joan Didion

This book about the death of Didion’s daughter, Quintana, is heartbreaking in part because it is somewhat jumbled. The shards of memory, shimmering as they are, do not finally fit together, quite. Instead, in its elliptical, kinetic way, the book offers something braver than coherence: a raw and rare integrity that resists resolution. – Leah Hager Cohen

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Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman

Economic rationality, psychologist Kahneman argues in his brilliant work on how we make choices, is all about coherence and logical consistency. This is a magisterial work, stunning in its ambition, infused with knowledge, laced with wisdom, informed by modesty and deeply humane. If you can read only one book this year, read this one. – Janice Gross Stein

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DarkMarket: Cyberthieves, Cybercops and You by Misha Glenny

British writer Glenny’s history of how cyber-crime went from the domain of lone-wolf hackers to a highly organized criminal underworld is entertaining, well written and any number of insightful diagnoses, such as the competitions between hackers, or the reasons why law-enforcement agencies have such difficulty working together. – Jeffrey Hunker

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When the Gods Changed: The Death of Liberal Canada by Peter C. Newman

The end of the Liberals and the rise and fall of Michael Ignatieff animate this important, timely and engaging book, the first to look at the 2011 election, probably a watershed in our history. Few do substantive, long-form journalism like this any more, and no one does it with octogenarian Newman’s eye, ear and ego. – Andrew Cohen
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